TASTE THE FUN AND ADVENTURE

C2 Sea Scuba offers the following Specialties plus many more:

SIDEMOUNT DIVER

Having scuba tanks on your back isn’t a requirement for exploring the underwater world. Many scuba divers have discovered the joy of mounting cylinders on their sides. Sidemount diving gives you flexibility and streamlining options. Plus, you don’t have to walk with heavy cylinders on your back – just enter the water, clip them on and go. Sound interesting? Sign up for the PADI Sidemount Diver Specialty course.

Along with learning about the many benefits of diving with a sidemount configuration, during one confined water and three open water scuba dives you’ll learn how to:

  • Properly assemble and configure sidemount scuba diving equipment.

  • Trim your weight system and sidemount gear so you’re perfectly balanced in the water.

  • Manage gas by switching second stages as planned, if wearing two cylinders.

  • Respond correctly to potential problems when sidemount diving.

ALTITUDE DIVER

Imagine descending below the surface of a clear mountain lake to explore a well-preserved wreck. Interested? Any time you scuba dive at an altitude higher than 300 meters/1000 feet above sea level, you're altitude diving.  If you’re ready to discover a hidden world where few have ventured, then the PADI Altitude Diver Specialty course is for you.

Learning to adjust your dive plan for the reduced surface pressure at altitude is an important part of the course. You’ll complete two scuba dives and learn:

  • Altitude dive planning, organization, procedures and techniques.

  • How to adjust your dive computer for altitude diving or calculate altitude dive profiles using the RDP Table or eRDPML.

  • How to avoid problems and handle emergency situations, if they occur, at altitude.
     

DEEP DIVER

The lure of the deep. There’s something exciting and mysterious about exploring deeper dive sites while scuba diving. Sometimes it’s a wreck that attracts you below 18 meters/60 feet, and on wall dives it may be a giant fan or sponge. Whatever it is, the deep diver course will allow you to scuba dive with confidence.

Your training starts by reviewing reasons for deep diving and how important it is to know your personal limits. During four deep dives with your instructor, you’ll go over:

  • Specialized deep diving equipment.

  • Deep dive planning, buddy contact procedures and buoyancy control.

  • Managing your gas supply, dealing with gas narcosis and safety considerations.

DRY SUIT DIVER

Want to stay warm? Want to extend your scuba diving season? Then dive dry. A dry suit seals you off from the water and keeps you comfortable, even in surprisingly cold water. There is incredible diving in the world’s cooler regions and in some areas, conditions are even better in colder months. Becoming a dry suit diver allows you to expand your boundaries and dive more places, more often.

The first thing you’ll discover is which dry suit style and accompanying undergarments are right for you and the diving you’ll do. Then you’ll learn how to take care of your dry suit. During two dives, in addition to a confined water dive, you’ll practice:

  • Putting on and taking off your dry suit with minimal assistance.

  • Mastering buoyancy control using your dry suit.

  • Dive safety procedures when using a dry suit.

ENRICHED AIR DIVER

The PADI Enriched Air Diver course is PADI’s most popular specialty scuba course. Why? Because scuba diving with enriched air nitrox gives you more no decompression time, especially on repetitive scuba dives. If staying down longer and getting back in the water sooner sounds appealing, then don’t hesitate to become an enriched air diver.

You’ll learn why diving with air that has higher oxygen and lower nitrogen content gives you more bottom time, along with enriched air equipment considerations. During a practical session, and two optional (or required) scuba dives, you’ll:

  • Discuss managing oxygen exposure.

  • Practice analyzing oxygen content in your scuba tank.

  • Set your dive computer for diving with enriched air nitrox.

EQUIPMENT SPECIALIST

Want to know about how your dive gear works? Don’t want to miss a dive due to minor issues with your scuba diving equipment. Whether it's a leaking O-ring, wetsuit tear or a broken fin strap, the PADI Equipment Specialist course teaches you to manage basic repairs and adjustments. You'll also learn more about how your gear works, making you more comfortable with it and better prepared to take care of your investment.

You’ll learn about routine care and maintenance procedures as well as scuba equipment storage recommendations. Your instructor will show you how to overcome some common equipment problems and offer equipment configuration suggestions.

PEAK PERFORMANCE BUOYANCY

Excellent buoyancy control is what defines skilled scuba divers. You’ve seen them underwater. They glide effortlessly, use less air and ascend, descend or hover almost as if by thought. They more easily observe aquatic life without disturbing their surroundings. You can achieve this, too. The PADI Peak Performance Buoyancy Specialty course improves the buoyancy skills you learned as a new diver and elevates them to the next level.

During two scuba dives, you’ll learn how to:

  • Determine the exact weight you need, so you’re not too light or too heavy.

  • Trim your weight system and scuba gear so you’re perfectly balanced in the water.

  • Streamline to save energy, use air more efficiently and move more smoothly through the water.

  • Hover effortlessly in any position – vertical or horizontal.

UNDERWATER NAVIGATOR

Be the scuba diver everyone wants to follow because you know where you are and where you’re going. The PADI Underwater Navigator course fine-tunes your observation skills and teaches you to more accurately use your compass underwater. If you like challenges with big rewards, take this course and have fun finding your way.

You’ll learn the tools of the trade, including navigation using natural clues and by following compass headings. During three scuba dives, you’ll practice:

  • Methods to estimate distance underwater.

  • Compass navigation while making at least five turns.

  • Marking or relocating a submerged object or position from the surface.

  • Underwater map making.

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C2 SEA SCUBA © 2013

Topeka, KS  |  info@c2seascuba.com  |  (785) 228-3535